Seam Ripping

 

Seam Ripping 

I remember learning to sew. You were so patient, teaching me to stitch seams on the machine and to hem by hand. Zippers were out of the question too hard for me at eleven years old, but I did manage buttons and sash ties. I remember getting so frustrated one time – I couldn’t make the terry cloth shorts work; I’d sewn the wrong pieces together and I was in a crying fit about having to rip the seams out. 

I threw the lime green shorts down and stormed off to my room, burying my head into my pillow. You didn’t follow as I expected you to do and it taught me that if I were going to succeed with anything, I had to learn to deal with mistakes along the way. Sure, it taught me to pick up the pieces when they fall apart at the sewing machine, but it transferred to other areas of my life. Now, when mistakes happen,, I plan a course of action, get out my seam ripper, and work on fixing it.  

12 Replies to “Seam Ripping”

  1. The value in “fixing” mistakes in sewing is that no one else ever sees the work the seam ripper has done when they look at the final product. Many times no one even knows if the sewing was executed according to design because of fabric and pattern variations. Great learning in your slice.

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  2. What a great metaphor for dealing with the mistakes we make in this life. Seam ripper has such a harsh-sounding feel to it, doesn't it. But it certainly fits what needs to be done sometime, and those times when we pick up the pieces and still get the job done is exactly that–harsh and difficult, but so very rewarding! I love the last line: “I plan a course of action, get out my seam ripper, and work on fixing it.” All things we can accomplish with a little perseverance.

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  3. I love that what appears to be one of the most important tools appears so destructive! I am not a sewer, but your Slice has brought me right in and I am fully appreciative of all that this Slice has to offer.

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  4. The description in the first part and the reflection in the second part work so well together. We all do need to learn how to rip it out and start over to make it better.

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  5. I echo the thoughts of others. You have me reflecting on my own sewing lessons and how home economics taught me lessons relevant to other classes w/ out my thinking much about it. We have a chance to “revise” our sewing we take for granted. Is it even possible to see w/ out a seam ripper. Wonderful metaphor. Love the second person point of view, too.

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  6. My mother was a seamstress. She took in sewing for other people at our home, and for many years worked at a local department store, tailoring men's suits and altering wedding gowns. I got none of her skill. She had to finish a T-shirt I started in Home Ec because it went so awry; one sleeve longer than the other and the neckline cut so unevenly that she couldn't undo it. I got a “C” on this project. I relish the symbolism and metaphors, especially the seam ripper. I read your words, and feel like I am home.

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  7. Thank you, Fran. Thankfully for me, there is a little margin for error in the projects I attempt. I have to examine the difficulty level pretty closely to find the easy stuff! 😀

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  8. Denise, thanks so much for sharing your thoughts! I had t noticed how harsh seam ripper sounds, but you are so right! The difficult work leads to a rewarding finish.

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  9. Glenda, you always being such insight with your comments. Thank you for reading and sharing today. I wondered about the POV, but I left it in second person as I first wrote it! I’m glad it seems to work here! 🙂

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